OriginalArt https://originalart.xyz Best Artists of all Time, Original Artwork Art Prints for Sale by Artist, Art Deco Nouveau, Arts Crafts, Art to Wear, Arts and Crafts, Art Set Portfolio Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://i1.wp.com/originalart.xyz/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/cropped-cropped-Art-160-x-160-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 OriginalArt https://originalart.xyz 32 32 120691142 ARTnews in Brief: Ugo Rondinone Plans John Giorno Tribute Show—and More from November 12, 2019 – ARTnews https://originalart.xyz/artnews-in-brief-ugo-rondinone-plans-john-giorno-tribute-show-and-more-from-november-12-2019-artnews/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:30 +0000 https://originalart.xyz/artnews-in-brief-ugo-rondinone-plans-john-giorno-tribute-show-and-more-from-november-12-2019-artnews/ Installation view of Ugo Rondinone’s 2015 video thanx 4 nothing. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GLADSTONE GALLERY, NEW YORK AND BRUSSELS. Tuesday, November 12, 2019 A Giorno Tribute at GladstoneWhen the artist John Giorno died last [...]

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Installation view of Ugo Rondinone's 2015 video 'thx 4 nothin'

Installation view of Ugo Rondinone’s 2015 video thanx 4 nothing.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GLADSTONE GALLERY, NEW YORK AND BRUSSELS.

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

A Giorno Tribute at Gladstone
When the artist John Giorno died last month at the age of 82, New York lost one of its great poets, performers, and organizers, and one whose involvement in the city’s art worlds stretched back more than half a century. Now his husband, Ugo Rondinone, is planning a memorial exhibition to his longtime partner at Gladstone Gallery in New York. Opening November 23 at Gladstone’s West 21st Street in Manhattan, it will showcase Rondinone’s large-scale video portrait of Giorno, thanx 4 nothing (2015). The piece focuses on the poet as he recites a poem on his 70th birthday, back in 2006, which touches on his friends, his life, his psyche, and a great deal more. The text, which provided the video’s name, begins, “I want to give my thanks to everyone for everything, / and as a token of my appreciation, / I want to offer back to you all my good and bad habits / as magnificent priceless jewels, / wish-fulfilling gems satisfying everything you need and want, / thank you, thank you, thank you, / thanks.” —Andrew Russeth

Phillips Appoints New International Specialist, Modern and Postwar, Paris
Thibault Stockmann will join Phillips as an international specialist in modern and postwar based in Paris. Stockmann spent a decade at Christie’s, specializing in Impressionist and modern art while working in Belgium. He moved to Christie’s Paris in 2016, working with Clara Rivollet, who is now a specialist in 20th-century and contemporary art at Phillips. “Thibault’s expertise and deep relationships with collectors will add even greater depth to Phillips’ growing presence in France,” said Jean-Paul Engelen and Robert Manley, worldwide co-heads of 20th century and contemporary Art, in a statement.

Bangkok Art Biennale Reveals Partial Artist List
The Bangkok Art Biennale has named 16 international artists who will participate in its second edition, which will open in the Thai capital on October 10, 2020. The first group announced includes Anish Kapoor, Dinh Q. Lê, Leandro Erlich, Julia Fullerton-Batten, Thanet Aowsinsiri, and Lu Yang. The presentation’s theme will be “Escape Routes,” with a focus on environmental, social, and political issues. The artists “will offer art practice as mind escapism where meditation, contemplation, ritualism, healing, and performance become the essence of hope and optimism,” Apinan Poshyanada, artistic director of the exhibition, said in a statement. The biennale’s curatorial team includes Sook-Kyung Lee, senior curator of international art at the Tate Modern in London; Wutigorn Kongka, assistant professor in the departments of architecture and fine art at King’s Mongkut Institute of Technology Ladkrabang in Bangkok; and Ong Puay Khim, former deputy director of curatorial programs at the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore.

Mohamed Bourouissa Wins Top Photography Prize
Artist Mohamed Bourouissa is the 2019 winner of the Deutsche Börse Prize, one of the world’s most esteemed photography awards, which comes with £30,000 (about $36,000). Bourouissa, who figured in the first New Museum Triennial, “Younger Than Jesus,” in 2009, is best known for images of African-Americans that subvert traditional images of cowboys, some of which were on view at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville in Paris last year. Bourouissa was shortlisted for this year’s award alongside Anton Kusters, Mark Neville, and Clare Strand.

ICA VCU Names Inaugural Research Fellows
The Institute of Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond has named its inaugural research fellows: artists Paul Rucker and Nontsikelelo Mutiti. Rucker will oversee an initiative focused on race and the arts and facilitate a dialogue series, and Mutiti will work on publications for the museum. The museum also named two new curatorial appointments. Egbert Vongmalaithong, the museum’s current retail manager, will now be its assistant curator for commerce and publications, and Amber Esseiva, an assistant curator, has been promoted to associate curator.

National Portrait Gallery in London

National Portrait Gallery in London.

NICHOLAS BAILEY/SHUTTERSTOCK

Monday, November 11, 2019

National Gallery Launches Campaign to Purchase Orazio Gentileschi Work
The National Gallery in London is seeking donations to help raise the last £2 million (about $2.5 million) needed to buy Orazio Gentileschi‘s painting The Finding of Moses (ca. 1630), which has been on long-term loan to the museum from a private collection for nearly 20 years. The work is one of several pieces painted by Gentileschi during his 12-year residence in London at the court of King Charles I. The full cost of The Finding of Moses is £22 million (about $28.2 million), though the net cost to the National Gallery is £19.5 million (about $25 million) by a private treaty sale arranged through Sotheby’s and Pyms Gallery. According to a release, the institution has until the end of the year to buy the painting, or “it may be lost to the nation.” Donations can be made via the museum’s website, over the phone, and checks sent in the mail.

Prix de Rome Names 2019 Winner
Artist Rory Pilgrim has won the 2019 Prix de Rome, which comes with €40,000 (about $44,100) and a residency at the American Academy in Rome. Pilgrim, who lives and works in Rotterdam, makes films, performances, music, drawings, and more that have focused on activism and social change. He received the award for his film The Undercurrent (2019–ongoing), which focuses on the lives of a group of young people in Boise, Idaho, and examines notions of sanctuary. Other nominees for the prize included Esiri Erheriene-Essi, Femke Herregraven, and the duo Sander Breure and Witte van Hulzen. The finalists’ work will figure in an exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.

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Stolen Art Cases May Implicate Diplomats: Report – – ARTnews https://originalart.xyz/stolen-art-cases-may-implicate-diplomats-report-artnews/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:29 +0000 https://originalart.xyz/stolen-art-cases-may-implicate-diplomats-report-artnews/ A protest outside the Venezuelan embassy in Washington, D.C., from which paintings have reportedly been stolen. ERIK S LESSER/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK A number of recent cases of missing art involve government officials around the world, according to [...]

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A protest outside the Venezuelan embassy in Washington, D.C., from which paintings have reportedly been stolen

A protest outside the Venezuelan embassy in Washington, D.C., from which paintings have reportedly been stolen.

ERIK S LESSER/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK

A number of recent cases of missing art involve government officials around the world, according to a report published by the Art Newspaper.

The analysis underscores growing concerns about abuses of power on the diplomatic level. The notion of diplomatic immunity has become a flash point of late, with Anne Sacoolas, the wife of a United States diplomat to the United Kingdom, named as a suspect in a car crash that killed a British teenager.

TAN‘s piece said that Ladislav Otakar Skakal, a former honorary consul at the Italian embassy in Cairo, is alleged to have stolen over 21,000 artifacts from his host country, and Egypt’s attorney general has issued an international request that he stand trial. Additionally, paintings by Armando Reverón, Héctor Poleo and Manuel Cabré are now missing from the Venezuelan embassy in Washington, D.C.

“Diplomatic pouches are not normally checked at a border when leaving a country of origin,” Till Vere-Hodge, an art and cultural property lawyer, told the publication.

Similar cases in recent years include the 2011 theft and fire at the British Embassy in Libya, from which £130,000 (about $167,000) worth of art was lost. In 1992, a Joachim Wtewael painting stolen from Moscow by the wife of the Togo ambassador showed up at Sotheby’s in London—that case was heard in the U.K.’s high court, which ruled that the work had to be returned to Germany, where it was originally looted in 1945.

“Once an object has been illegally moved across borders, that blemish on the object won’t disappear just because you are a diplomat,” Vere-Hodge told TAN.

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In Office Above Ground Zero, Tiny Cubicle Hosts Contemporary Art Gallery Focused on Monuments and Memory – – ARTnews https://originalart.xyz/in-office-above-ground-zero-tiny-cubicle-hosts-contemporary-art-gallery-focused-on-monuments-and-memory-artnews/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:27 +0000 https://originalart.xyz/in-office-above-ground-zero-tiny-cubicle-hosts-contemporary-art-gallery-focused-on-monuments-and-memory-artnews/ Installation view of “Clynton Lowry: Tony and His World,” with his video work Flag (2011/19) on view. COURTESY MELANIE “Art of the City” is a weekly column by Andrew Russeth that runs every Tuesday. A Gallery [...]

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Installation view of

Installation view of “Clynton Lowry: Tony and His World,” with his video work Flag (2011/19) on view.

COURTESY MELANIE

“Art of the City” is a weekly column by Andrew Russeth that runs every Tuesday.

A Gallery Above Ground Zero

Over the past few years, art galleries have opened in some fairly unorthodox locations: a bulletin board in a dumpling shop, a cat tree, a 2006 Toyota Scion, even a trash can. Now there is one in a cubicle on the 16th floor of a tall office building in downtown Manhattan that looks over Ground Zero. It is called Melanie, and it just finished its third show.

The office it calls home belongs to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and one recent evening it was quiet and still. All of the museum’s staffers had left for the day. The gallery’s founder, an artist named Joe Graham-Felsen, turned on a screen next to his computer. Once it came to life, a video by Tracy Molis appeared, showing her waxing the bronze parapet that surrounds the Michael Heizer–like waterfall memorial down below, where the World Trade Center’s South Tower once stood. During the day, that long bronze plaque receives a fair amount of wear and tear—people touch and make rubbings of the names printed on it. Every night, workers carefully clean them.

“As an artist, I have thought a lot about the site and the events of 9/11 and memorialization,” Graham-Felsen said, watching the video. He is tall, soft-spoken, and 35 years old, and he was a junior in high school in Boston when the tragedy occurred. In December 2001, he visited the site for the first time, and he kept returning to it and studying it in subsequent years.

Installation view of

Installation view of “Tracy Molis and G William Webb: Life Instinct” at Melanie, New York, with work by Webb at left and Molis at right.

COURTESY MELANIE

When he got a job in the museum’s conservation department last year, “I was excited about the opportunity to embed myself within this organization,” he said later, in an email, “to help care for the objects in the collection and to really understand the activity involved in presenting the history of 9/11, honoring the victims, and memorializing the events.”

Sitting nearby on his tidy desk, just above a filing cabinet, was the other half of the show: two small, rough-hewn steel wedges by G. William Webb—one delicately balanced against the other—that would not look out of place at the solemn museum, burrowed hundreds of feet below ground, which has wreckage and artifacts from the disaster and its aftermath.

All of the work that Graham-Felsen shows at Melanie resonates in some way with its charged location. Speaking with friends and acquaintances, he explained, “I realized there is a broader conversation with a lot of artists that deal with this subject matter. This was an interesting opportunity to bring that work to the fore and into this context.”

Melanie’s first show, which ran late last year, consisted of nearly pitch-black photographs of the area by the New York–based artist Matthew Booth. That one was something less than authorized. “I just did it at first, and I was a little bit nervous,” Graham-Felsen said. Soon enough, though, he asked for, and received, permission to keep doing exhibitions at his compact workspace. (His programming is not in any way affiliated with the memorial and museum, he emphasized.)

On view at Melanie earlier this year: Matthew Booth, 'Evening, Lower Manhattan, NY'

On view at Melanie earlier this year: Matthew Booth, Evening, Lower Manhattan, NY, 2016/2018, mounted inkjet print in powder-coated aluminum frame, 14.5 × 11.5 × 1.25 in.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MELANIE

Running Melanie (the name of the cubicle’s previous occupant, which Graham-Felsen found on an old seating chart) requires some careful logistical work—and some compromises. Because of the security restrictions of modern offices (not to mention the fact that he has a full-time job), the gallery has no public hours. His work colleagues sometimes swing by his desk to see and discuss the shows, but most people view them online. When an exhibition is up, he keeps his desk free of clutter, except for copies of its press release. “I’ve gotten very good at using my desk drawers, careful not to have any errant items on the desk surfaces,” he said.

Its shows also do not occur at quite the frequency of a standard gallery, but Graham-Felsen is in the process of finalizing plans with more artists. “Though it’s 18 years on, the great shift that took place in the aftermath of the 9/11 still guides our daily lives,” he said, “and we need artists to continue to help us process that change.”

Like a lot of intriguing art, and like a lot of worthwhile galleries, Melanie seems to have taken on life of its own, slipping away from any straightforward explanations for its existence. “I wanted to present art in this space to show how it can engage difficult subject matter and reveal new ideas about the world we live in, our history, our memorial practices, our political machinations,” Graham-Felsen said at one point. But later, he admitted, “Sometimes I feel like I’m conducting a research project of which the outcome is unknown.”

Performance view of Paul Pfeiffer's 'University of Georgia Redcoat Band Live'

Performance view of Paul Pfeiffer’s University of Georgia Redcoat Band Live, a Performa work co-commissioned with VIA Art Fund for the Performa 19 Biennial. The project was curated by Kathy Noble.

WALTER WLODARCZYK

Night at the Apollo

In what has to be a first, a sizable portion of the New York art world—noted curators, artists, dealers, and the like—stood together for “The Star Spangled Banner” last night at the Apollo Theater on West 125th Street in Harlem, some even placing their hand on their heart and singing along. With a 50-person-strong division of the Georgia Redcoat Marching Band providing the music, arrayed along the aisles and stage of the storied space, it was futile to resist the magnetism of the moment.

The man responsible for it all was the ingenious Paul Pfeiffer, a former chair of the University of Georgia’s art department, who asked the band to play a full football game’s run of music (2-and-a-half hours) as his contribution to the ongoing Performa biennial. On a screen that floated over the stage, a live feed of the Bulldogs stadium in Athens showed another 350 or so band members (plus cheerleaders) blasting away, and the New York contingent did a gallant job of playing in sync—toasting imaginary touchdowns, starting and stopping with the course of play, bursting into song and gags, and even doing a little heckling.

Eventually, word spread that everyone could wander around the theater, taking in the action from side rooms, balconies, and the stage (which seemed a touch sacrilegious). People grabbed beers and wine and M&Ms, and nodded along to the Redcoats’ renditions of Led Zeppelin’s “Kashmir” and Kanye West’s “Power,” before settling into seats for the halftime show. Even with no game to watch, it was disturbing just how exhilarating it still was to get caught up in the cues from the band. Victory always seemed one moment away.

The Bulldogs are ranked fifth nationally, and first in the SEC. They play 13th-ranked Auburn on Saturday. One imagines they will have a few new fans rooting them on.

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Two Poems by Silvina López Medin https://originalart.xyz/two-poems-by-silvina-lopez-medin/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:23 +0000 https://originalart.xyz/two-poems-by-silvina-lopez-medin/ Roy DeCarava, “Hand and coat”(c. 1962), on view at David Zwirner 2019 (photo by Elisa Wouk Almino/Hyperallergic) I am writing this on my head, my hands inside gloves that don’t match   I lose at [...]

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Roy DeCarava, “Hand and coat”(c. 1962), on view at David Zwirner 2019 (photo by Elisa Wouk Almino/Hyperallergic)

I am writing this on my head, my hands inside gloves that don’t match

 

I lose at least one
from the pair per season
and hold on to the other, that single
glove left behind still contains the lost one.
That is to say
on the winter break I read Pascal Quignard,
in each image there’s a missing image,
says he, I add
in each sound there’s a missing sound,
say: my mother
how she, because of her hearing impairment,
is permanently reconstructing
sentences from fragments, isn’t that
writing? I am
walking the nine blocks back home
from the subway, it is -18 degrees
and I’ll never know
how to turn that into Fahrenheit or how
at times I focus on something so much as to become
something else. Gloves
prevent us from breaking apart,
gloves are not relevant in Buenos Aires
this cold does not exist
the kind that makes you turn not only your head
but your whole body just to look at
what’s coming. I did not write much
back there, just brought
a couple of summer images: my mother and I
at night standing in front a white wall
killing mosquitoes; my mother,
my sons, I, in the backyard,
hurrying to take away the clothes from the clothes line
under light rain.

April 17, 2019

La memoria de un sonido is the name of an old literary magazine my friend lends me. The memory of a sound. First issue of the two it lasted. Just two, like a direct sound and its reflection. Waves crashing against walls. Or a child running into a mother’s hard lap.

— — —

When you first realize that your parents are as abandoned as yourself, you are filled with terror, you start asking yourself who’s the caregiver here? says Argentine filmmaker Lucrecia Martel in an interview in the magazine.

— — —

Scene: Exterior. Day. Veranda in Buenos Aires. February, 2012. My mother and I sitting on a sofa, facing forward. She is talking about her eldest brother, who recently died in a car accident. “Those years my mother left me with my aunts, he was the only one that visited me.” She sobs, she’s split in half. She’s at her aunts’ house with her brother. She’s here at the veranda with me. I cannot hold the pieces. We’re facing forward, I cannot turn around. The sofa fabric is plastic, rigid, I can feel its pattern marking the backs of our thighs.

— — —

It was on February 21, 2012, almost one year since the birth of my eldest son. The phone rang, it was my mother’s voice saying “Enrique is dead. A bus ran over him. He did not hear the horn.” No introduction, no details, no real conclusion. A chain of facts, broken, pieces scattered.

— — —

My uncle’s hearing impairment was more severe than my mother’s. It was hard for him to articulate most sounds. It was sometimes hard for us to understand, not him, but the words coming from him. Yet he insisted, he did not mind parting words, repeating, asking back. Words would become more material, we could almost touch them.

— — —

In the interview, Martel goes on to speak about speech and time: when someone talks, they may use verbs in the present, past or future tense, this temporal quality of words dissolves the idea of consecutive, chronological flow.

In this photo, there is the sepia layer of my mother and her brother in the 1950s, sitting close though not holding each other. And then there is a red spot: the present tense of my mother’s nail polish, her fingers holding her phone to take a photo of the photo. Her fingers holding themselves.

Family photo, 1950s

— — —

Who’s the caregiver here? I must have thought sitting on the veranda sofa by my mother. I must have gotten lost in the thought, unable to act.

— — —

I wrote a poem about it. A piece left out of some past book. I won’t translate it from my native language, so you can at least read this, Mother.

Siesta 

Nos dábamos la espalda
ese sonido ahogado
madre, qué era:
por primera vez te escuchaba llorar,
me quedé quieta
apreté la almohada contra la oreja
la almohada con el olor de tu pelo
no pregunté
no me di vuelta
esperé que pasara pero crecía
tu llanto
entre las dos.
Hicimos lo que pudimos, quedarnos
cada una en su lugar
y en algún momento dormirnos.

***

The interview mentioned is from “La memoria de un sonido: Una conversación con Lucrecia Martel,” by Paula Jiménez España, Al oído, September, 2011, 4–11.

***

Silvina López Medin was born in Buenos Aires and currently lives in New York. She has published three books of poetry: La noche de los bueyes (1999), which won the Loewe Foundation International Young Poetry Prize, Esa sal en la lengua para decir manglar (2014), and 62 brazadas (2015). Her chapbook Excursion was selected by Mary Jo Bang as the winner of the 2019 Oversound Chapbook Prize and will be published by Oversound in 2020. Her play Exactamente bajo el sol (staged at Teatro del Pueblo, 2008) was granted the Plays Third Prize by the Argentine Institute of Theatre. She co-translated Anne Carson’s Eros the Bittersweet (2015) and Home Movies (2016), a selection of poems by Robert Hass, into Spanish. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from New York University. She is an editor at Ugly Duckling Presse.

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Guerrilla Girls Target MoMA Trustees With Ties to Jeffrey Epstein in an Ad Takeover https://originalart.xyz/guerrilla-girls-target-moma-trustees-with-ties-to-jeffrey-epstein-in-an-ad-takeover/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 14:21:20 +0000 https://originalart.xyz/guerrilla-girls-target-moma-trustees-with-ties-to-jeffrey-epstein-in-an-ad-takeover/ Guerrilla Girls’s ad takeover outside the Museum of Modern Art on West 53rd Street in New York (photos courtesy of Luna Park) “Advice to the Museum of Modern Art about BIG donors with BIG ties to [...]

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Guerrilla Girls’s ad takeover outside the Museum of Modern Art on West 53rd Street in New York (photos courtesy of Luna Park)

“Advice to the Museum of Modern Art about BIG donors with BIG ties to Jeffery Epstein,” reads a poster that appeared on a phone booth across the street from the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in Manhattan this past weekend. It continued: “MoMA should Kick Leon Black & Glenn Dubin off its Board immediately, drape the Black and Dubin Galleries in black, & put up wall labels explaining why.” The ad is signed by the veteran activist group Guerrilla Girls, who added their signature gorilla mask logo at the bottom of the poster. “The Guerrilla Girls volunteer to help write those labels,” the group adds.

Last month, the New York Post reported that MoMA had quietly named a gallery on its fourth floor after its trustee Glenn Dubin and his wife Eva, a couple that had close ties to Epstein, the disgraced sex offender who killed himself in a Manhattan prison in August of this year. In a 2015 defamation suit unsealed this past August, Virginia Giuffre, one of Epstein’s accusers, claimed that in 2001 the predator exploited her as a “sex slave” at the age of 16 to a number of his powerful friends, including Prince Andrew and Alan Dershowitz. Giuffre claimed that Dubin, a hedge fund billionaire manager, was her first powerful client.

Furthermore, the sex offender had reportedly invested $10 million in Dubin’s hedge fund. His wife Eva reportedly dated Epstein prior to her marriage to Dubin in 1994. The Dubins denied any knowledge of Epstein’s misconduct. “The Dubins were horrified by and completely unaware of Jeffrey Epstein’s unspeakable conduct,” a spokesman on their behalf told the Post. “They categorically deny the allegations and have evidence disproving them.” But Vanity Fair reported that the couple has stayed in touch with Epstein after his conviction as a sex offender in 2008 and invited him to a Thanksgiving dinner while he was already a registered sex offender.

As of this morning, the poster was still up on the phone booth, according to RJ Rushmore

Epstein was also a board member at the Leon Black Family Foundation, a non-profit established by the chairman of the Museum of Modern Art’s board of trustees, as reported by the New York Post earlier this year. Epstein appeared on the list of board members of the foundation through the end of 2012, years after his conviction in sex crimes. A spokesperson on behalf of the Black family told Bloomberg that Epstein resigned from the foundation in July 2007 to the family’s request and that his name kept appearing in the filings due to a “recording error.”

Guerrilla Girls carried out their surreptitious ad takeover this weekend with the help of Art in Ad Places, a guerilla-style activist group formed by writer RJ Rushmore, photographer Luna Park, and actor Caroline Caldwell. “We saw Guerrilla Girls’ tweet about MoMA’s board and thought: Wouldn’t that message be even more powerful right outside the museum? We can make that happen, so we reached out and offered to help,” Rushmore told Hyperallergic in an email. As of this morning, the poster was still up on the phone booth, according to Rushmore.

“As we’ve seen recently at the Whitney and cultural institutions across the UK, it takes a combination of tactics to pressure museum boards and donors,” Rushmore added. “Viral tweets, critical essays, artists withdrawing work, and direct action at the doors of the institution can all play a part.”

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