Morning Links: Digital Mapping Edition – ARTnews

Virtual 3D reconstruction of San Pier Maggiore, by Donal Cooper in collaboration with The National Gallery, supported by the Getty Foundation as part of its Digital Art History initiative.

COURTESY FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE AND HISTORY OF ART, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, MIGUEL SANTA CLARA AND NATIONAL GALLERY, LONDON

Frieze Los Angeles

Coinciding with the fairs in the city this week, Sterling Ruby’s “Damnation” exhibition at Sprüth Magers gallery in L.A. features a new video focused on the prison-industrial complex. [ARTnews]

At the Frieze fair, which opens for previews today, a pop-up replica of the storied Max’s Kansas City—a New York establishment frequented by Andy Warhol, David Bowie, and John Lennon—will be on view. [The New York Times]

Frieze Adjacent

The former artistic director of Frieze Art Fairs for the Americas and Asia, Abby Bangser, is creating a new art and design fair called Object & Thing, which is slated for Brooklyn in May. [Artnet News]

Architecture

Bloomberg reports that the architect Richard Meier, who was accused of sexual harassment last year, remains in an active role at his company, Richard Meier & Partners, which, according to the publication, has lost no clients as a result of the allegations. [Bloomberg]

The Tate Modern in London has won a privacy suit in which owners of four luxury apartments claimed that the museum’s tenth floor terrace—which has panoramic views of the city—subjected them to “near constant surveillance.” [The Guardian]

Conservation

The Getty Foundation has given $1 million in grants for the digital mapping of cultural heritage sites in Italy, Brazil, and Turkey. [Hyperallergic]

Exhibitions & Screenings

For his new show at Whitechapel Gallery in London, artist Simon Fujiwara has created a “mini museum” showcasing reproductions of Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi. [The Art Newspaper]

On view at Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art are portraits of black and white Americans taken by the photographer Hugh Magnum between 1897 and 1922. [The New Yorker]

A film by Zhang Yimou has been pulled from the 69th Berlin Film Festival. The work, titled “One Second,” is set in China’s Cultural Revolution, and festival organizers said the film was withdrawn from the event “due to technical difficulties.” [The New York Times]

Powered by WPeMatico

AdSense

Collectibles

%d bloggers like this: